The World, A Girl, & Her Words...

Ramblings on Global YA, Books, & Other News

What Does Global Ya Mean to You? Gloria Chao

Hey All of you YA Lovers Around the Globe ~

As you may have picked up on, Young Adult Books (YA) & it’s readers & writers & communities—are spinning webs around the world connecting us in new ways. As a way to appreciate that, I’ve asked some International and American authors to share what that means to them. This week and next will be filled with their responses! We would love to hear YOUR responses too! Either comment below or send me your response on my contact page. Read the original Global YA post here.

Today’s Global YA Author is the upcoming talented and adorable debut author, Gloria Chao. Her book, American Panda, will come out February 6, 2018. Look for it! For someone who currently lives in the land where Pandas roam, I’m eagerly anticipating this book!

So, Gloria, What does Global YA mean to you?

Global YA, to me, refers to fiction that is relatable to readers all around the world regardless of race, gender, or environment. While no one book can represent all aspects of someone’s life, there can be global themes throughout. For example, although my book, AMERICAN PANDA, captures the story of one Taiwanese-American teen, it also explores experiences that are virtually universal, including difficult family relationships, coming of age, and not quite belonging.

I’m thrilled to see how far young adult literature has come in uniting everyone, and I’m honored to be a small part of it. I hope it continues and we have more and more books so that eventually, teens can see all aspects of their lives represented in some way somewhere.

Gloria

* Want to connect with Gloria or learn more about her books? Go to her website here –for writers she has some killer posts on EVERYTHING from writing to agents to calls to submission to publishing. Go glean!

 

 

 

 

You Next.

**What does Global YA Mean to you?

**Where and what are YOU reading?

FIND MORE GLOBAL YA POSTS HERE:

Pintip Dunn

Lorie Langdon

 Kit Grant

 Sasha and Sarena

Athena Greyson

Aminah Mae Safi

Reena Deen

Carlie Sorosiak & Tara Lundmark

Jennieke Cohen

Ellen McGinty

Alex Reda

再见,(See you later in Mandarin!)

Nova

What Does Global YA Mean to You? Alex Reda

Hey All of you YA Lovers Around the Globe ~

As you may have picked up on, YA or Young Adult Books & it’s readers & writers & communities—are spinning webs around the world connecting us in new ways. As a way to appreciate that, I’ve asked some International and American authors to share what that means to them. This week and next will be filled with their responses! We would love to hear YOUR responses too! Either comment below or send me your response on my contact page. Read the original Global YA post here.

Today’s Global YA response is from Romanian Science Fiction author Alex Reda. She’s  my fabulous fellow PitchWars Alum and is currently in process with her novel with her agent, Natascha Morris of BookEnds. Find her charming bio & contact below and be sure to connect with her on Twitter or Instagram! 

Alex Reda pic.jpg

So, Alex, what does Global YA mean to you?

I think today’s YA is striving to build bridges in a time bent on digging deeper barriers.  It helps us see worlds beyond our own, through authenticity and diverse points of view. You can scale the Himalayans or hike through New Zealand with a turn of a page. You can delve into experiences and celebrations with an upward swipe. And every new book you devour can lead to the same goal—connection through universal emotions.

As a Romanian writer, with English being my third language, I was lucky enough to be encouraged to read international books from the moment I learned my ABCs. Bedtime stories involved Town Musicians of Bremen and One Thousand and One Nights. I’ve travelled all across the globe through words—which turned into a mad case of wanderlust I’m trying to keep under control. Some stories try to transport me back to Romania, though I tell anyone who’ll listen that Romanians don’t have Russian accents, we’re not fond of stealing or begging, nobody names their kid Costel nowadays, and our mythology doesn’t include vampires. We do have werewolves, though 🙂

The real love of books began when I discovered YA. Being in a character’s mind, discovering life through their eyes, growing up (or reliving teenage years) alongside them in a much more personal way, is one of the reasons the genre’s so popular. Its unapologetic take on current issues, from the perspective of someone who has to live in the future we’re building now, makes YA vital. 

YA is more important than ever. It’s evolving in the best direction and takes on the injustice and cruelty we see and live. As a non-US writer, coming from a country which has been stereotyped in a decade that gave us Brexit and other monumental decisions, which produced an unwelcome amount of hate and cultivated fear, I hope more and more international authors can develop the genre, and incorporate our own points of view alongside the US and UK based narratives which have enriched literature so far. Which is why initiatives like Nova’s are so great. This is a time of change and Global YA can make a difference.  

—Alex Reda

BIO:

I’m Alex Reda, a YA contemporary and SF writer from Romania, proud member of the 2016 Pitch Wars class. When I’m not glued to my keyboard, I dash between lecture halls, daydreaming about plot bunnies and gorging on dark chocolate. One of my goals is to create someone’s future OTP. 

You can find Alex online:

Twitter: @Alex__Reda (https://twitter.com/Alex__Reda)

Instagram: @alex__reda (https://www.instagram.com/alex__reda/?hl=en)

Website: https://alexredalit.wordpress.com/about/

 

 

YOU NEXT: What does Global YA mean to you?

Where and what are you reading or writing?

xxx

Nova

FIND MORE GLOBAL YA POSTS HERE:

Pintip Dunn

Lorie Langdon

 Kit Grant

 Sasha and Sarena

Athena Greyson

Aminah Mae Safi

Reena Deen

Tara Lundmark & Carlie Sorosiak

Jennieke Cohen

Ellen McGinty

Thanks, Alex!

Nova

What Does Global YA Mean to You? Ellen McGinty

Hey All of you YA Lovers Around the Globe ~

As you may have picked up on, YA or Young Adult Books & it’s readers & writers & communities—are spinning webs around the world connecting us in new ways. As a way to appreciate that, I’ve asked some International and American authors to share what that means to them. This week and next will be filled with their responses! We would love to hear YOUR responses too! Either comment below or send me your response on my contact page. Read the original Global YA post here.

Today’s YA Author, Ellen McGinty, is American but lives in Japan with her husband who grew up in Japan! She has incredible insight on diversity within culture. Ellen is represented by Marissa Corvisero and Kaitlyn Johnson at Corvisiero Literary and is currently in process with her novel which, not surprisingly, includes a diverse cast–  mainly Japanese–and is set in the Japanese Alps. How cool is that?

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So, Ellen, What does Global YA mean to you?

I’m a Texas girl – who rode an alligator in her front yard. I now live in Japan and ride a mamachari (an old bike for moms) instead. Global YA took me literally from the swamp to across the ocean. But books, like life, offer more than a cross-culture experience. To me, the greatest thing about Global YA is its ability to cultivate understanding. To explore diversity within culture and the universal truths all people share.

Someone once said, “Your writing is not Japanese enough.”

Had this been said to me, I’d offer quite a few “gomen nasai’s” and do my absolute best to remedy the problem. Most of my writing is set in Japan with a largely Japanese cast. But the person who said that was speaking to a Japanese writer.

I think too often culture is presumed to fall into a certain range (ahem stereotype) even within the publishing world. That’s why sometimes #ownvoices authors are told their writing isn’t “own” enough. But the truth is, it is enough! Our world has become a diverse place. And Global YA celebrates that diversity, especially when it exists within culture. It’s easy to see overarching trends in culture – Japan has sushi, anime, vending machines, and even the cashiers at McDonald’s bow when you walk in the store. But that is by no means, Japan.

There is an Indian restaurant on my street, I know Japanese bear hunters, belly dancers, and a handful of other occupations you won’t see in a travel brochure. Many of my friends are Japanese Christians, other’s expats who have lived in Japan for decades. Not to mention differences of personality, socioeconomic status, and everyday life struggles. We are all people with unique experiences and that’s what Global YA represents.

Everyone.

That’s the beauty of diversity and why I love writing Global YA. It’s a contrast of collective culture and individuality that highlights the divine spark in all of us. That every person is valuable.

I love the fact that I can read scores of novels set in other countries, but each author has a different experience and understanding of that culture. For example, books set in Japan might include feminism, Christianity, homosexuality, explore what it’s like to be half-Japanese, Japanese-American, or an expat living in Japan. All different aspects of the same culture written by different people who either are Japanese or have experienced Japan and been changed by it. I know I’ve changed, both by the Japan I love and the global writing community. It celebrates the fact that everyone has a story to tell – and a unique voice to tell it.

Connect with Ellen on twitter and check out her beautiful Novel Aesthetics for her novel set in the Japanese Alps.

 

YOU NEXT: What does Global YA mean to you?

Where and what are you reading or writing?

xxx

Nova

FIND MORE GLOBAL YA POSTS HERE:

Pintip Dunn

Lorie Langdon

 Kit Grant

 Sasha and Sarena

Athena Greyson

Aminah Mae Safi

Reena Deen

Tara Lundmark & Carlie Sorosiak

Jennieke Cohen

Thanks, Ellen!

Nova

What Does Global YA Mean to YOU? Jennieke Cohen

Hey All of you YA Lovers Around the Globe ~

As you may have picked up on, YA or Young Adult Books & it’s readers & writers & communities—are spinning webs around the world connecting us in new ways. As a way to appreciate that, I’ve asked some International and American authors to share what that means to them. This week and next will be filled with their responses! We would love to hear YOUR responses too! Either comment below or send me your response on my contact page. Read the original Global YA post here.

Today’s YA Author, Jennieke Cohen, is definitely more than one thing! She’s also my fellow PitchWars Alum and represented by Jennifer Unter. I’m excited for you to hear another example of how this world really can’t fit into a box–and how books can bring us more understanding.

So, Jennieke, What does global YA mean to you?

My parents have always had a healthy dose of wanderlust. My father attended no less than nine colleges around the world for his undergraduate education, and my mother moved to the U.S. from the Philippines when she was 14. Despite having no real ties to the Netherlands, they decided to name me after a Dutch model. They took me on my first trip out of the U.S. before I’d even turned a year old. Photos of me as an infant bundled up in a puffy, insulated onesie as I sat in my dad’s arms at the Eiffel tower are now faded with age. Even as a baby, I was a citizen of the world.

Throughout my childhood, my parents dragged my siblings and me on vacation after vacation, from country to country. On every trip, my dad would pull out his guidebook and find the best local bookstore. (Bonus points if they had a large English section or something for us kids to read!) One summer in Banff, when I was about thirteen, I found a book called The Nine Days Queen by Karleen Bradford at the local bookshop. I’d never seen it at the bookstores back home, and I honestly don’t think I ever saw it in a bookstore again. I’d never heard of Lady Jane Grey before (for any non-history buffs, she was a fifteen-year-old who ruled as Queen of England for nine days in 1553), and I had no idea that her life ended tragically, but I gobbled up the story. As we walked through the Canadian wilds, I’d whip out my book at every break and continue reading about injustice in 16th century England.

When I finished, I was bawling at the unfairness of it all; I can’t remember any book making me cry before that. In the following weeks, I couldn’t stop thinking about Lady Jane Grey and her short, sad life. When I’d traveled to England with my family, I’d never really enjoyed it. After finishing The Nine Days Queen, all I could think about was how I hadn’t appreciated so many of the places we’d visited in the UK. I started reading other books that took place in England: first Jane Eyre, then the Austen canon, then anything else that sounded interesting. (Not so coincidentally, my first YA book deals with injustices and gender inequalities in 19th century England.) I started reading adult history books about the Tudor era and the early 19th century, time periods rarely touched on in my middle school and high school history classes. I went on a foreign exchange to England in high school and spent a summer in college studying history at Cambridge University. And my conclusions then, as now, were that history informs our modern lives just as traveling with my parents informed how I understood the world and my own place in it.

If you’re reading this, there’s a good chance you believe, as I do, that great YA books can make a difference. Had I not found that specific book in that small bookstore, I wonder how much of my life would have changed. For me, finding the right YA book in another country opened up new realms of knowledge. It inspired me to spend more time learning about other countries’ histories and cultures. In short, the right YA book gave me a better understanding of the world.

Jennieke Cohen (JEN-ih-kah CO-en) is used to people mispronouncing her name and tries to spare her fictional characters the same problem.  Jennieke writes historical fiction for young adults inspired by real people and events because life is often stranger than fiction. She studied English history at Cambridge University and has a master’s degree in professional writing from USC. Jennieke loves exploring new locales but always returns home to Northern California where the summers are hot, the winters are mild, and life is casual. Read more on Jennieke’s website www.JenniekeCohen.com or find her on Twitter @JennikaCohen

YOU NEXT: What does Global YA mean to you?

Where and what are you reading or writing?

xxx

Nova

FIND MORE GLOBAL YA POSTS HERE:

Pintip Dunn

Lorie Langdon

 Kit Grant

 Sasha and Sarena

Athena Greyson

Aminah Mae Safi

Reena Deen

What Does Global YA Mean to You? Carlie Sorosiak & Tara Lundmark

Hey All of you YA Lovers Around the Globe ~

As you may have picked up on, YA or Young Adult Books & it’s readers & writers & communities—are spinning webs around the world connecting us in new ways. As a way to appreciate that, I’ve asked some International and American authors to share what that means to them. This week and next will be filled with their responses! We would love to hear YOUR responses too! Either comment below or send me your response on my contact page. Read the original Global YA post here.

Today we have TWO YA authors sharing with us today!

First is the brilliant, continent-hopping author, Carlie Sorosiak. Her first book, If Birds Fly Back, came out earlier this year and her second book, Wild Blue Wonder will come out in 2018.

So, Carlie, What does Global YA mean to you?

Global YA offers a chance for readers to engage with other cultures and perspectives, which builds empathy and understanding. A book that immediately pops into mind for me is Zana Fraillon’s The Bone Sparrow; it’s set in an incredibly bleak Australian refugee detention center, and I think it’s a tremendously important read.

Carlie

Want to connect with Carlie and know more about her books? Or perhaps which continents she’s been hopping? Try her on twitter Or her website or even on NanoWrimo (where I met her!). She’s super friendly and loves engaging people!

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Our second Global YA author is world traveler and Third Culture Kid, Tara Lundmark, who spins immensely creative and intense stories and is currently querying her latest novel.

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One of the hardest questions for me to answer is, “Where are you from?” I spent my entire childhood moving from country to country. I was born in the US to American parents. Blonde hair, blue eyes. But I spent most of my early life Mexico, Guatemala, Spain and Bolivia. I was three when I learned to speak Spanish fluently. I attended international schools. My best friends were from Mexico, Taiwan, Pakistan, Jordan, Greece, and Bolivia.

I was always different—in looks and culture—from most of the kids I spent time with. But when we went “home” to the U.S. during the summer, I felt even more different. People didn’t understand me. Sure, I spoke English, but I didn’t fit their mold. Unless they got on a plane and experienced what I had themselves, they found it difficult to relate to me. And mutual understanding goes deeper than just foreign countries or different languages. It’s often hard to understand people who live in our same city who hold different religious beliefs, economic, or racial backgrounds.

As our global village grows closer together, it’s more important than ever to foster understanding with each other, and books—particularly diverse fiction—is one way to achieve that. The magic of storytelling from an own voices point of view can really place the reader in the characters’ shoes. Short of actually living someone else’s life, story-telling is the most effective and most accessible way to gain the understanding and magic that comes when a young reader realizes that we are all more similar than we are different. We share hopes and dreams and loves and fears. We are all beautiful and individual pieces in a stunning mosaic that is our earth.

Connect with this incredible global dreamer here and learn more about her life and novels.

YOU NEXT: What does Global YA mean to you?

Where and what are you reading or writing?

xxx

Nova

 

FIND MORE GLOBAL YA POSTS HERE:

Pintip Dunn

Lorie Langdon

 Kit Grant

 Sasha and Sarena

Athena Greyson

Aminah Mae Safi

Reena Deen

What Does Global YA Mean to You? Reena Deen

Hey All of you YA Lovers Around the Globe ~

As you may have picked up on, YA or Young Adult Books & it’s readers & writers & communities—are spinning webs around the world connecting us in new ways. As a way to appreciate that, I’ve asked some International and American authors to share what that means to them. This week and next will be filled with their responses! We would love to hear YOUR responses too! Either comment below or send me your response on my contact page. Read the original Global YA post here.

Today’s Global YA/MG International Author, is the talented and adventurous Singaporean-Indian author, Reena Deen. She’s my fellow PitchWars Alum writing bud, DvPit Winner, and soon to be globe trotter-writer extraordinaire. Phoenix is currently querying her latest book.

 
So, Reena, What does Global YA mean to you?

Thank you for the wonderful opportunity! I would love to share my thoughts on Global YA 🙂

One of the things I notice when I read books is how the characters talk in the story. Usually, it’s all American slang or it’ll be British. Even POC characters in the stories talk the same way, obviously because the stories are set in USA or UK.
But many of us have our own slang because many of us live in other countries. It’s true that most us are familiar with American and to some extent the British style of talking but we don’t usually talk like this in our own countries. We have become familiar because that’s all we see in movies , hear in music and read in books.
So to cut a long story short, global YA means just that to me – global. Featuring stories set in the countries around the world with their own authentic cast of characters & unique way of expression.
I am Singaporean, it’s a tiny Island city in South East Asia, where Chinese, Indians, Malays & Eurasians have lived peacefully together for more than a hundred years. Since our country has four main races, we developed our own unique language – Singlish. It’s a unique way of talking in English with a mixture of words from the various local languages. When I first started writing, my characters would speak in Singlish. But unfortunately this was not well received, I think many people found it hard to understand.
I found this frustrating because initially as kids we too found it hard to understand the American/British slang in books and movies but we got used to it.
But the tables were turned when I read the book ‘The Hate You Give’. Initially I found it a little hard to understand the slang used by the characters but I stuck with it thanks to the wonderful reviews ( So glad I did !!)
That’s when I realized why other people would find it hard to understand when my characters spoke in Singlish. It wasn’t their fault, they just weren’t used to it. This is all the more reason why we need to have global books, not just YA but in every age category.  We grow up on a diet of books, movies and music which largely only features the American/British white culture. This in itself becomes a barrier for books set in other countries to be published. So it’s important to arrest this trend now.
It wouldn’t be so much of an issue, even thirty-forty years ago when people still held on to their own culture, values,language etc. But thanks to globalization ( which is pretty darn good thing, coz if not for it, I wouldn’t even be writing this, lol ), most of the first world countries who are increasingly exposed to American culture embrace it as their own.
The world is not confined to a few countries’ culture but that’s how it is today. Even though there is more diversity in books and to some little extent movies, it’s still based on characters living in countries like USA, UK etc. Simply put, an Indian living in Singapore will not have the same experiences, culture or even language as an Indian in USA, Malaysia or India. This is what global YA would mean for me and why it is important for me. I would really love to read more books on POC living in other countries.
That said, the current publishing industry, writers, agents and editors are doing a lot to boost diversity. Five years ago, I thought that international publishers wouldn’t be keen in reading a story about an Indian Muslim character living in Singapore. But my experiences have proven me pleasantly wrong. I was selected as PitchWars mentee last year in the wonderful Brenda Drake’s PitchWars where I met Nova as well as other amazing writers who have been very supportive of me as a POC writer. Both Beth Phelan’s DVpit and the open call for Muslim writers organized by Cindy Uh of Thompson Literary and Clelia Gore of Martin Literary Management have helped me immensely in my writing journey.
Sometimes I am hesitant to write my stories because of the current Geo-politics. But thanks to all this support, I continue writing. And at the end of the day, this is what global YA or for the matter Global books is all about.
Everyone coming together to read, share and more importantly support the stories of everyone else.
Once again, thank you so much Nova!
Reena Deen
Hope you can connect with gem of an author from around the world. She is everything lovely and spirited. Find her here on twitter.
Read more Global YA posts here:
You Next:
What does Global YA mean to You?
Where and what are YOU reading?
Bye,
Nova, signing off
 

What Does Global YA Mean to You? Aminah Mae Safi

Hey All of you YA Lovers Around the Globe ~

As you may have picked up on, YA or Young Adult Books & it’s readers & writers & communities—are spinning webs around the world connecting us in new ways. As a way to appreciate that, I’ve asked some International and American authors to share what that means to them. This week and next will be filled with their responses! We would love to hear YOUR responses too! Either comment below or send me your response on my contact page. Read the original Global YA post here.

Today’s Global YA International Author, is Amina Mae Safi, debut author of Not the Girls You’re Looking For, which will come out June 2018. She’s a writing ninja and explores all kinds of amazing projects like screenwriting/film, magazines, feminism, art, and more. Learn more about her here.

 So, Aminah, What does Global YA mean to you?

So, I’m such a comic book nerd, but I just saw the new Thor movie and in it there’s a line, “Asgard is a people not a place.” And I think that’s what Global YA means to me. You don’t have to be in a specific place to read about cultures and experiences beyond your own. You can connect with readers and writers from around the world– through a love of the same books, the same genre, the same stories. Maybe it’s because I’m the daughter of an immigrant, but I love the idea of a community being people, rather than any one space. Story helps us find our common humanity.

Cheers,

Aminah Mae

 

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You Next:

What does Global YA mean to you

Where and what are YOU reading?

Nakkamin,

Nova

What Does Global YA Mean to You? Athena Freya Greyson

Hey All of you YA Lovers Around the Globe ~

As you may have picked up on, YA or Young Adult Books & it’s readers & writers & communities—are spinning webs around the world connecting us in new ways. As a way to appreciate that, I’ve asked some International and American authors to share what that means to them. This week and next will be filled with their responses! We would love to hear YOUR responses too! Either comment below or send me your response on my contact page. Read the original Global YA post here.

Today’s Global YA International Author is the lovely Swedish writer, Athena Freya Greyson, who also assists with #kidpit, one of our beloved twitter contests that connects writers with brilliant agents. She is beyond talented and her stories reflect a global flavor in every way. Don’t miss her magical blog here. (For someone like me, who has lived in Scandinavia, I really want to see her Scan-characters in print!!!) Athena is currently polishing her manuscript in order to query. Hint: I really love her response.

So, Athena, What does Global YA mean to you?

It means everything. It means giving a Swedish young writer and avid reader the opportunity to read a book like The Hate You Give, by Angie Thomas, and feel its heartbreak. It means escaping to the Victorian era and battling monsters and discrimination in A Shadow Bright and Burning, by Jessica Cluess. Global YA is the doorway to beautiful stories of love, hope, and heartbreak as well as worlds that surpass our own imagination.

Who am I? My name is Athena Freya (I prefer to be called Freya but everyone is stuck with Athena so whatever 🙂 ) and I live in Sweden. Though, I was born and raised in Greece. You’d think that two European countries wouldn’t be so different from each other, but they are. I didn’t fit in one cultural box, like Nova so beautifully articulated it. I had ideals that stemmed from a Swedish/Scandinavian way of thinking that didn’t fit with the society I was living in. Fitting in was impossible for me, and I struggled a lot. Then, books came into my life, and everything seemed brighter. Harry Potter made me think of a world beyond what I was seeing. Divergent made me realize, I want that too. I want to write a book that readers around the globe would enjoy. The Percy Jackson series told me that there are many people out there who love mythologies as much as I do. All these books made me feel less alone, and they gave me a purpose. I wanted to go beyond being an avid reader, obsessed with fantasy, witches, mythologies, etc. I wanted to write that. And I do.

But as a writer, you also have the ethical and creative duty to write books that represent the world. Even if you write fantasy. And the key here is representation. As a Swede, I can’t imagine writing a book without a Swede/Scandinavian character or without a Swedish/Scandinavian cultural element. But that doesn’t mean excluding other cultures. Literature should unite and reflect the world we live in. Why write a book about Norse mythology with all white straight characters? Why even write a book with just Norse mythology? I say: Include everybody. If you think that all Swedes are white, blonde, and with blue eyes, think again, lovely readers. Well, most Swedes do have blue eyes, so scratch that. But you get my point, I hope. The world is so big and so diverse; it’s literally a sin to minimize it and have it shaped after a mole that doesn’t even make sense. The book I’m querying right now, for example, is set in a diverse society of mixed mythologies. Sure, Thor is cool and *coughs* very hot. But why not include Magec, the illustrious Berber goddess of radiance, or Beaivi-nieida, the Sami goddess of healing and medicine? And yes, there are Scandinavian mythologies and folklore outside Norse mythology and the hot Thor, which is why it saddens me every time I see in #mswl that they’re looking for non-Western cultures/settings. We may not be marginalized but we’re not being fully represented, either. There are so many stories and worlds out there. Why not write books that represent all of them?

On a personal level, global YA is more than just reading YA literature. It’s more than just writing it. To me, global YA is more about connecting to people around the world. Hear and feel perspectives different from my own. Relate to others who are troubled by the same problems as I am. Find people to share myself with. If not for Twitter, the YA and writing community, I would never have found my best friend– the one person who understands what I’m feeling and what I’m going through without me saying a word. And if you’re a writer who has, is, or will be querying in the near future, you understand how crucial it is to have such people in your life. People to shoulder the burden of rejections and drag you from the pit of self-doubt. Heck, if not for global YA, I wouldn’t be invited to this lovely discussion!

That’s what global YA has brought me. Pure and powerful friendships that will last a lifetime. Support, laughter, hope, love, and a security blanket that makes this cruel world okay. That makes me feel safe enough to be myself. It doesn’t matter if no one at the university I’m attending is devouring books the way I do. Though, I have already found hardcore Harry Potter fans that I’ve connected to through my Deathly Hallows necklace. haha But all this is a testament to how global literature is. It has no limits. No bounds.

We’re not alone. Global YA is there to pick us up when we fall and lift us up when we need it. And that’s the miracle of literature.

Athena

*Wasn’t Athena’s response beautiful? Have anything to say to her? Connect with her. She’s got all kinds of great stuff to say, which is probably why so many people follow her blog! Find her now on twitter or blog here.

More Global YA posts here:

Pintip Dunn

Lorie Langdon

Kit Grant

Sasha & Sarena Nanua

YOU next:

**What does Global YA mean to you?

**Where and what are you reading?

Hejdo, (ps: there should be a circle over that a!)

Nova

What Does Global YA Mean to You? Sasha and Sarena

Hey All of you YA Lovers Around the Globe ~

As you may have picked up on, YA or Young Adult Books & it’s readers & writers & communities—are spinning webs around the world connecting us in new ways. As a way to appreciate that, I’ve asked some International and American authors to share what that means to them. This week and next will be filled with their responses! We would love to hear YOUR responses too! Either comment below or send me your response on my contact page. Read the original Global YA post here.

Today’s Global YA International Authors are the young and fearless Canadian authors, Sarena and Sasha Nanua, authors of The Pendant Trilogy, PitchWars Winners, amazing book bloggers, Publishing interns, and We Need Diverse Books Spokeswomen, and who also recently signed with a fantastic literary agent!

So, Ladies, What does Global YA mean to you?
First off, thanks so much for inviting us to your blog, Nova!
We love the idea of books being able to transcend time and space. That’s what makes books almost literally “immortal”; especially with the boom of eBooks, we will always have a record for books that have been published. “Global YA” to us means that these books can reach people in any time period and (most) locations across the world, and these books can profoundly affect people. Global YA is being able to reach through the pages and touch readers that might be completely like you, or completely unlike you. We were born and grew up in Canada, and so being Canadian is a major part of our identities; some people might see that in our books, and some might not. We are also Indian, and in our newest manuscript, we’ve created an Indian-inspired world and tried to make it feel fresh and real. To us, it shouldn’t matter what genre you’re writing–contemporary or high fantasy–but that world and those characters should always feel real, as if you could see, sense, or smell the world you’ve entered.
We guess that’s where “Global YA” comes in–being global is not just about spanning cultures and nations, or being international, but it’s about being intertwined–it’s about seeing how our lives are interconnected. To us, YA can bring people together, show us the ups and downs of growing up. In that way, YA has always been “global,” because it can unite people from everywhere around the globe, and can show us identities and cultures that need to be seen. The WNDB movement does a great job of this. (And that’s why we *LOVE* YA, and seeing more and more diverse books being published!)
Sarena & Sasha
If you haven’t already, get to know these inspiring young authors here on twitter or on their website. They love chatting books and writing–and you can’t find anyone kinder.
 Read more Global YA interviews:
You Next:
**What does Global YA mean to you?
**Where and what are YOU reading?
Cheers,
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IN ASIA

Nova

 

 

Blog Series: What Does Global YA mean to You? Kit Grant

Hey All of you YA Lovers Around the Globe ~

As you may have picked up on, YA or Young Adult Books & it’s readers & writers & communities—are spinning webs around the world connecting us in new ways. As a way to appreciate that, I’ve asked some International and American authors to share what that means to them. This week and next will be filled with their responses! We would love to hear YOUR responses too! Either comment below or send me your response on my contact page. Read the original Global YA post here.

Today’s Global YA International Author, is British-Mauritian author Kester ‘Kit’ Grant, a truly global woman and YA rockstar. Her upcoming debut, the first book in a trilogy, A Court of Miracles, will come out in 2018 with Knopf Randon House. She’s my PitchWars Alum writing bud, and if her witty personality doesn’t make you love her instantly than you’d better take another look. For a glimpse into Kit’s global and rebel life, look here.

So, Kit, What does Global YA mean to you?

I think new era’s in YA literature such as the inclusion of more diverse and ownvoices narratives can only ever be a positive thing. I, for one, grew up devouring literary classics where I barely ever saw anyone who was brown like me – unless it was a racist or trope heavy stereotype. My personal “revenge” has been to take what I loved from the classics and reimagine them with characters of diverse backgrounds – whilst retaining a narrative true to the era.

When I look at the world today I get very angry at the injustice. I’ve also found that people who are full of hate are not very inclined to listen or be open to change. My personal response is to write my truths down in the hope that it might change the hearts and minds of the younger generations that read my story, so that’s where I focus my message and feelings about the ugly and wrong things I see around me.

Although YA is a space that is growing and evolving, as a non-American I am hopeful that the genre will make room for more international authors and the rich perspectives voices and influences they can offer. You see some of this in the film and TV world, where (for example) English and European series, and Chinese or Indian cinema can win awards and be considered some of the world’s best contributions to the genre.

~Kit Grant

Read more Responses here:

Lorie Langdon

Pintip Dunn

You next:

**What does Global YA mean to you?

**Where and what are You reading?

Sayonara,

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#rippedjeans

Nova

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